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Fiction and the Age of LiesColin Burrow
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Fiction and the Age of Lies

Colin Burrow

The line between making a fiction and telling a lie has been blurry at least since Homer, and liars – from Odysseus and Iago to Austen’s Wickham and beyond – have often played central parts within fictions. This lecture will aim to tell some (though not all) of the truth about the relationship between lies and fiction from Homer to Ian McEwan, and will ask if fiction has responded adequately to the maggoty abundance of lies in public life at the present time.

Colin Burrow delivers the first of the LRB's 2020 Winter Lectures, from the British Museum.

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